Imagine for a moment that you are a professional NASCAR driver. You’re mid race, barreling around the track at 200 MPH and you notice your dashboard indicator lights show an issue with your tire pressure. Moments later you pull into the service area and your well trained and well equipped pit crew change your tires out with precision, getting you back on the road without skipping a beat. Now imagine the alternative, you pull in for service and your crew is unprepared, stumbling for appropriate tools, missing critical parts, and costing you valuable time.

 

Now, when it comes to effectively designing, building, programming and servicing your luxury Crestron automation system, which crew do you want in your corner? Home automation is about simplifying and streamlining your life the same way a pit crew streamlines a race. GMI and the #DoneRightNotEasy crew pride ourselves in bringing the right skill levels and tools to the job to ensure your system works each and every time it’s needed.

 

This process starts before we even set foot on the job site. Once a system is designed around the needs of the end user, we work with our equipment vendors to create a detailed list of every piece control equipment, video or audio source, lighting array, and everything else needed for the project. This level of documentation and planning is critical to the end result as it allows us to stage a job site appropriately with adequate tools, equipment, and personnel. To accomplish this we keep our work vans and work areas clean and organized, ensuring that when a tool is required for a task it is always close at hand and ready to use.

 

Once we begin to build out system infrastructure with wiring and rack construction, it is imperative that these items are done properly and cleanly, even if the end user will never see the back end. Considerable problems can arise when the proper care isn’t taken in designing and building racks. For example, what many engineers fail to understand is that there are specifications pertaining to the maximum number of a certain type of device that can be on a communications loop prior to malfunction occurring. We take care to install the proper hubs, repeaters, or similar components adequately handle the number of devices able to communicate on a single loop. We also use supporting bars in our racks and velcro to guide wires from point to point between component parts. Keeping like wires together with each other and organized properly keeps power wires away from power limited control system wiring and ensures system functionality

 

Once racks are built and in place, and wires properly run throughout a home, the knowledge to properly code and program the system is one of the most important tools in our war chest. We aren’t just programming commands, but full fledged conversations between gear who oftentimes are speaking different programming languages. The more streamlined the code, the better the systems will work at the high level our clients come to expect.

 

The final tool we bring to the job site is perhaps the most important, and it the #DoneRightNotEasy crew themselves. Assembling a team of experienced and competent engineers allows us to bring all of the previously discussed tools together under one roof. We work closely with our clients so they stay comfortable throughout our process. From design, to installation, to the final product itself, our team is there every step of the way, deploying our unique skills to the appropriate parts of a job to ensure a simple, reliable and intuitive automation system that streamlines our client’s life.

 

At the end of the day, a Crestron automation system, like a NASCAR racing unit, will only run as well as the crew, tools, and knowledge in place to keep it that way.

 

Interested in bringing the #DoneRightNotEasy crew into your home or office. Contact us today to learn more.

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Michael Restrepo

Senior Engineer at GMI Automation
Michael Restrepo is a Senior Engineer at GMI Automation specializing in advanced automation systems.
Michael Restrepo
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